Is Regex Match

Is Regex Match searches for a pattern and returns a Boolean (True/False) and thereby enables the user to check whether certain expressions occurs inside a given input text. You can either search for a known or unknown expression and, in the case of the latter, define the pattern of the expression using our wizard.

 

Known Pattern

Step 1: Pattern configuration

  1. Firstly, you have to decide whether you want to provide a static keyword or search for the value of a variable.
  2. Secondly, you have to provide the necessary input (either the keyword itself or a variable containing the keyword).
  3. Under Configuration you can select the following check boxes:
    • Stand alone expression search: Your search is restricted to keywords that are located between word and non-word characters (e. g. a space or a colon). This might be helpful if you want to assure that you will only match a substring which consists of word characters and is enclosed by spaces (or any other non-word character). Instances where your pattern is enclosed by other word characters would not result in a match.
    • Case sensitive enabled: Differentiation between lower-case and upper-case letters (e. g. matches if pattern is “Test: word” and string is “Test: word”. This would not be the case if the string is “test: word”).

Step 2: Test pattern on example test

  1. Type your example test into the textbox (here: “This is a test”).
  2. Click on the Button Test.
  3. The result shows you whether your pattern has been found in the example text (True) or not (False).

Step 3: Define output

  1. You can either select a already existing variable from the dropdown menu or create a new boolean variable by typing a name into the text field.

 

Unknown Pattern

Step 1: Pattern configuration

  1. Select the type of the pattern you want to search for (“Word“, “Text“, “Number“, “Integer“, “EmailAddress“ or “TelephoneNumber“).
    • Word: Matches one or more word characters (e. g. “my“ and “life“ in “my life“ but not “l.i.f.e“ in “my l.i.f.e“).

    • Text: Matches any character (except a new line) zero or more times.

    • Number: Matches any positive or negativ number with “.“ or “,“ as thousand/decimal separator (e. g. “1.787“, “-1,000.00“, “1“).

    • Integer: Matches any positive or negative whole number (e. g. “10“, “-23“ but not “2.2“, “1,000“).

    • EmailAddress: Matches all common email addresses with an @-sign in between and .xx, .xxx, .xxxx at the end (e. g. myemail@cmail.com but not “myemailcmail“, “myemail@cmail.c“).

    • TelephoneNumber: Matches one or more digits including the characters “+“, “*“, “#“, “(“, “)“ and “-“ (e. g. “+49 (0)170 8976768“ but not “1,700,000.00€“).

  2. Specify the position at which you expect your pattern to appear
    • After: You expect that your pattern appears after a given substring and you type this substring into the textbox next to “After“ (e. g. if string = “[…] Your Email: max.mustermann@anothermonday.com […]“  you would check the box “after“ and enter “Your Email: “ into the textbox)
    • Before: You expect that your pattern appears before a given substring and you type this substring into the textbox next to “Before“ (e. g. if string = “[…] 78988776 (customer number) […]“ then you would check the box “Before“ and enter “ (customer number)“ in the textbox)
  3. You can provide a minimal or/and maximal length of the pattern you are searching for. This length does not include any characters that appear after or before the pattern.
  4. Under “Configurations” you can select one or both of the following check boxes:
    • Stand alone expression search: Your search is restricted to patterns that are located between word and non-word characters (e. g. a space or a colon). This might be helpful if you want to assure that you will only match a substring which consists of word characters and is enclosed by spaces (or any other non-word character). Instances where your pattern is enclosed by other word characters would not result in a match (e. g. matches if pattern is “(c\w+)” and stand alone expression search is checked: “My cat cannot be replaced by a dog.” However, when you leave it unchecked the result will change: “My cat cannot be replaced by a dog.”).
    • Case sensitive enabled: Differentiation between lower-case and upper-case letters (e. g. matches if pattern is “Test: \s*(\w+)” and string is “Test: word”. This would not be the case if the string is “test: word”).
  5. The Pattern textbox shows you the Regex pattern that has been created as a result of your selection. If your pattern needs adjustment, this is the place to customize your pattern even further.

Step 2: Test pattern on example test

  1. Type your example test into the textbox (here: “This is a sentence.”)
  2. Click on the Button “Test”.
  3. The result field shows whether your pattern has been found in the example text (“True”) or not (“False”).

Step 3: Define output

  1. You can either select a already existing variable from the dropdown menu or create a new Boolean variable by typing a name into the text field.
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